Premise

Every JROTC unit we have visited or worked with, regardless of the branch, regardless of the geographic location, regardless of the instructors, has one thing in common. Most JROTC cadets cannot pass a simple 20 question Leadership Inventory Exam with questions as elementary as:

    * Which is a Role of the Officer?
    (a) responsibility
    (b) motivation
    (c) discipline
    (d) direction
    * One of the Leadership Styles is:
    (a) suggestive
    (b) direct
    (c) delegative
    (d) assertive
    * Of all the Leadership Traits and Principles, which one is the most important?
    (a) Set the Example
    (b) Loyalty
    (c) Integrity
    (d) Honesty
    * A Leadership Objective is?
    (a) Being a Leader
    (b) Accomplishing the Mission
    (c) Troop Welfare
    (d) Either b & c

Most units score in the low 50’s on this exam, even those who have covered the material in a regular classroom setting within the previous 30 days.

Cadet Officers usually have no idea what the Roles of the Officer are, and even if they can recite the Roles, they have no idea how to apply them in everyday JROTC activities. Cadet NCOs are little better informed and usually learn leadership from watching other Cadet NCOs in their unit, with mixed results. Most cadets mistakenly believe it is always their duty to participate in the labor involved in a task, regardless of their rank. All of this results in less effective Cadet NCOs, and much ineffectual leadership among Cadet Officers.

Our research* shows the main reason cadets cannot score higher marks on the Leadership Inventory Exam is the inherent subjectivity of a course like leadership, which demands an experiential teaching model be employed to be effective, which cannot be accomplished adequately in classroom training limited to 50 minutes or less a day. Another reason is competitions drive much of the training emphasis in JROTC today. In some units extra curricular activities such as marksmanship, drill, and color guard are responsible for more training hours than curriculum subjects.

* The research referenced on this page was accomplished with MCJROTC units in Region 4 in 2009, 2010 and 2011. Additional research was conducted in 2011 with MCJROTC units in Region 3, and AFJROTC units at the SW Region SLS 2012.

Cadet Leadership Course

To enhance the effectiveness of leadership training in MCJROTC, we have created an intense Weekend Day Camp program using the experiential teaching model almost exclusively. Cadets are placed in real life situations where they must use all of the Elements of Leadership, all of the Leadership Traits, all of the Leadership Principles, and all of the Leaderships Styles to accomplish seemingly impossible tasks. At the end of this training, they not only can define all of these, they know how to employ them effectively.

In addition to the Leadership Inventory Examination, we administer a Leadership Application Examination at the end of each course with questions such as:

    * A Sgt orders his squad to police the area. He tells them why it needs to be done, and he tells them how he wants it done, Which element of leadership is missing?
    (a) purpose
    (b) direction
    (c) motivation
    (d) none
    * The unit you have command of has been given a single complicated task that must accomplished within 24 hours. You have several squad members with experience in this area, but you have no applicable training or experience personally. Which style of leadership is most appropriate for this task?
    (a) participative
    (b) delegative
    (c) responsive
    (d) authoritarian
    * The officer in charge of a work detail must leave the squad for a meeting. No one takes charge of the squad during his absence to complete the task they were on when the officer left. Who is responsible to command for this lack of performance?
    (a) the persons doing the task
    (b) the senior NCO
    (c) the officer
    (d) all of these

All units who complete this Weekend Day Cadet Leadership Course are able to attain an average score on the much more complicated Leadership Application Examination in the mid to high 80’s. A score of 70 is passing. The failure rate is usually no more than 1 to 3 cadets. Most units have no failures.

Cadets also learn in the course of this training such important leadership concepts as: Responsibility, Integrity, Commitment, Troop Welfare, Moral Courage, Values, Morals, and Ethics. Post training, cadets usually become more active in their units, are more eager to achieve advancement, more willing to accept failure and keep going, and are much more able to see the value of a college education and a billet in an ROTC program upon graduation from high school.

Cadet Leadership Course Plus

To further enhance the effectiveness of leadership training in MCJROTC, we have also created a more intense weekend training called Cadet Leadership Course Plus. Again, cadets are placed in real life situations where they must use all of the Elements of Leadership, all of the Leadership Traits, Leadership Principles and Leadership Styles to accomplish seemingly impossible tasks. At the end of this training, they not only can define all of these, they know how to employ them effectively.

In the Cadet Leadership Plus training, we add two of the most challlengeing events from our Senior Leadership Course training. These trainings are usually weekend overnight camps.

Cadet Leadership Course Plus includes the Leadership Inventory Examination and the Leadership Application Examination at the end of each course.

Senior Leadership Course

Team Wall

Leakers

Intent vs. Mechanism

To enhance the effectiveness of leadership training in MCJROTC, we have created an intense and challenging Senior Leadership Course Competition Summer Camp. This program, like our Cadet Leadership Course Weekend Day Camp, which we present at schools around the region in the winter and spring months, uses the experiential teaching model almost exclusively. Cadets are placed in real life situations where they must use all of the Elements of Leadership, all of the Leadership Traits, all of the Leadership Principles, and all of the Leaderships Styles, to accomplish seemingly impossible tasks.

At SLC we add the element of competition. Competition motivates cadets to go beyond where they ever thought they might go. There are two kinds of competition at SLC. First there are the squad competitions. Going beyond those there are the school competitions. At every event cadets are competing for their squad, while at the same time earning points for their school by demonstrating their leadership abilities. At the end of the training, the school that has earned the most points is declared the “Leadership Honors School” for the next school year in that area.

SLC is all mission driven. All competitions start with a mission briefing being handed to the squad leader. Without any input or assistance from the camp instructor or Marine Instructor onsite, except for safety concerns, the squad leader must lead his squad to accomplish the mission they have been assigned. The squad leader, and the squad, will receive a pass or fail at the end of each event, and a debriefing with active participation of all members of the squad, the camp instructor and Marine Instructor.

Squad leaders are selected from a predetermined confidential list so cadets can be thrown into leadership at any time without warning. They may be given any manner of mission for which they may or may not have experience or training. This forces them to utilize all of the talents and abilities available to them from within their squad. Every mission requires the squad leader to use all three leadership styles to be successful and earn a pass.

Cadets take back to their units many new leadership skills with the mandate to share this information with their peers and subordinates to further enhance the ability of their units to be successful in accomplishing all of their missions throughout the year. This has the added benefit for competition teams; drill, color guard and marksmanship, also benefit from this training as their rates of success improve.

Post training, cadets usually become more active in their units, are more eager to achieve advancement, more willing to accept failure and keep going, and are much more able to see the value of a college education and a billet in an ROTC program upon graduation from high school as a real possibility for them.

MCJROTC TUITION

Cadet Leadership Course (CLC)

3 Days - 0 Nights

18 Hours of Training

$45/cadet/day*

Cadet Leadership Course Plus+ (CLC+)

3 Days - 2 Nights

24 Hours of Training

$65/cadet/day*

Senior Leadership Course (SLC)

5 Days - 4 Nights

60 Hours of Training

$185/cadet/day*

*Minimum 50 cadet trainees – maximum 100 cadet trainees. All tuition fees are plus travel expenses for our camp staff. Call for a quote for over 100 cadets

Facilities Rental

The cost for facilities rental, including billeting, chow and use of training areas averages $50 per person per day, including Cadets, Marine Instructors and our Camp Staff. Facilities are usually faith based summer camps, university campuses, and military training facilities.

Turnkey Training

We provide all training equipment, instructors and medical personnel. Upon request, we will arrange for a camp facility, billeting, chow and training areas for each Senior Leadership Course. When requested, we will invoice for all of the above and disburse payments for all included expenses